Nova Scotia History - 1906

In 1906, the first workers came to Nova Scotia. George Johnson and Tom McGivern crossed over from the Old Country at the same time as Blanche Chappell but they stayed in Newfoundland. The boat stopped there on the way to Nova Scotia. There were no friends in Newfoundland at that time. While there, we went out on a train on Monday morning, Nettie Miller and Blanche, to see what Newfoundland was like. They had never seen houses made of wood before. They wanted to get a drink of water from some house so they could see inside. However, when they asked for a drink of water, they were not invited inside. On Sunday while in Newfoundland, they went up to Signal Hill and had a bible talk and then came back to the boat for dinner. In the evening they attended a church service. George Johnson and Tom McGivern got jobs on a farm in Newfoundland until their companions would join them after the Convention. Jimmie Patrick later joined George Johnson.

 

When Blanche arrived in Nova Scotia, Convention was waiting for them on Dawson Street in Dartmouth, on August 19, 1908. There were nine workers here for the convention. The Convention lasted for a week or so. In Ireland, the Convention would be a month long. Convention was much the same as ours. Many good things were told. There were 39 friends in attendance. There were present six workers that came over in 1906; five or six more came over in 1907. Some of the first workers who came over were: Albert Quinn, John Devin, Jimmie Patrick, Willie MacAlister, Mary Cook, Annie Dodds, John Stone, Kate Adamson, George Walker. George Walker came over in September of 1903 to Philadelphia. Mr.William Brown professed in 1908. They were present at the Convention, also Mr. and Mrs. John Marks and Mrs. Wright. She was the first one to profess in Nova Scotia.

 

Blanche Chappell and Margaret Cook later went to Hants County. They stayed with a Mrs. Captain Card. She made a start but did not continue. Mrs. Masters was professing in Summerville. Nine weeks were spent in Upper Rawdon in a mission. Kate Adamson and Annie Dodds were in Brooklyn. Mr. Jake Bloyce professed and he later came to Conventions for years. He had no fellowship during the year. In April we had a Convention. After Convention we went to New Brunswick until August. In August 1909, Kate Adamson and Blanche came to the Annapolis Valley. They stayed there and had meetings in Cambridge. The people came out all right. We met Merinda Sawler. The School Master there was a little uppity. He went to Blanche one night and said, "You are of considerable education, I expect." If we had of had more education, he no doubt would have taken in more.

 

After that we went to Coldbrook; the Lockharts then began to come. Ella Lockhart came every night. It was 2-1/2 miles to the meetings. After five weeks, the hall was taken from us. Mr. Lockhart felt badly because of it. However, Mrs. MacCall opened her home then for the meetings. Mr. Lockhart became quite interested. We were looking for him to decide, and used to test the meetings often then. The last night before we were leaving for Special Meetings at Mount Uniache, John Stone came to the meeting. He went home with the Lockharts to the Mountain and Mr. Lockhart got desperately worked up. He said, "What will I do?"  His wife said to do what the man told you. He made his choice. Elva was 9 years old at the time. The next day Mr. Lockhart came in for breakfast and it was not ready. He went into his room. Elva went to call him when breakfast was ready and, for the first time in her life, she saw her father on his knees. He came to the table and the first time, he gave thanks. After breakfast, he said, "I hope to be a better father in the future."  Elva wondered what he meant by that. She came to the conclusion that daddy wouldn't swear any more. When she was twelve, her father asked her when she was going to decide to serve the Lord. She told him she was too young. He asked her how old Jesus was when he began. to be about His Father's business, and she had to say twelve. These words haunted her. Elva decided at Special Meetings. Willie Snedden had the meeting. At that time they used to test the meetings during Special Meetings. Mr. Lockhart professed for about 20 years before his death. He died of a growth on the brain. Mrs. Lockhart professed at a Special Meeting. Blanche Chappell went out in the work in 1907 from a convention. Harry Dennison and John Baille went to France in 1907 for Conventions. In 1908 they came over to Quebec to preach among the French Canadians.